BRING THE ADIRONDACKS INTO YOUR CLASSROOM


ADIRONDACK CHALLENGES

Connecting Earth with Plants & Animals of the Adirondacks
Print This Challenge
Grade: 8th Grade
Class: Art
Author: Pamela Winchester
Ogdensburg Central School
NYS Content Area Standard:
The Arts:
Standard 1: Creating, Performing, and Participating in the Arts
NYS Interdisciplinary Standard:
Adirondack Curriculum Content Area:
Natural HistoryCulture & The Arts
Performance Indicators:

Know and use a variety of sources for developing and conveying ideas, images, themes, symbols, and events in their creation of art

Keywords: habitat, food chain, ceramics
The Challenge:
Investigative Question or Issue: How might the web of life found in various Adirondacks habitats be revealed in our artwork?
Context:

In addition to appropriate art materials for producing pottery, students in this project will need access to resources for researching information about different habitats found in the Adirondacks and the relationships among the various organisms within the food chain of those habitats. Collaboration with a science teacher would be ideal.

The Challenge:

Working in small teams organized with the assistance of your teacher, design and build a clay pot/bowl that illustrates one of the food chains in a specific Adirondack habitat you have chosen. As you prepare to engage in this challenge, do the following:

- Choose an Adirondack habitat that is of interest to your team. Ideally each team should choose a habitat that is different from the others in the class

- Research the various plants, animals, land forms, and water resources that are part of the food chain typical for your chosen habitat. Create sketches of what you find as you research. Be prepared to discuss your understanding of the food chain in your habitat with your teacher.

- Sketch out ideas for how you might represent the various elements of the food chain

- When you are finished with your research, fill out the Habitat Worksheet provided by our teacher

When you are ready to build your clay pot, be sure to consider the following requirements:

- Each student in the group is responsible for contributing to the "food chain" pottery by  making either a producer, a herbivore, a carnivore or a decomposer in the form of a clay slab.

- The group as a whole is responsible for creating a clay border and base that shows the unique characteristics of your chosen habitat.

- Your group has the option of making additional clay slabs that illustrate additional aspects of the habitat like animal shelters, additional plants for food, of additional animals like a predator, water or man (I find the more slab shapes, the more successful the pot).

Follow the production process outlined below to construct this project:

- Each student should sketch the two slab shapes he/she will be making in detail and in porportion to the other plants and animals in the biome. (Colors and textures are a must on this sketch)

- Each student should roll out, carve, and assemble their two clay slab pieces into a plastic lines container (like a flower pot or plastic bowl form). (A day of "curing" is necessary for each slab before assembling it in the form. This is a good time to make the base)

- Each group should complete the base (coil is an easy method here)

- Each group adds larger slabs to the bolw covering the smaller ones, smoothing the inside and attaching the base, body and border well.

- Each group completes the border and signs their names and the name of their biome in the pot.

- When pot is leather hard, group trims and smooths unnecessary areas and adds textures and details that got lost in the pot's formation.

Quality Standards:

- Group fills out the worksheet which describes their chosen biome.

- Each student sketches the two slab shapes he/she will be making in detail and in porportion to the other plants and animals in the biome. (Colors and textures are a must on this sketch).

- Each student rolls out, carves and assembles their two clay slab pieces into a plastic lines container (like a flower pot or plastic bowl form). (A day of "curing" is necessary for each slab before assembling it in the form. This is a good time to make the base.)

- Each group completes the base (coil is an easy method here).

- Each group adds larger slabs to the bolw covering the smaller ones, smoothing the inside and attaching the base, body and border well.

- Each group completes the border and signs their names and the name of their biome in the pot.

- When pot is leather hard, group trims and smooths unnecessary areas and adds textures and details that got lost in the pot's formation.

- The finished product accurately depicts important elements of a food chain in the selected Adirondack habitat

(See additional notes on Adirondack Biomes - important resource: Adirondack Council (518-873-2240) poster "The Adirondack Park - A Park of People and Natural Wonder", illustrated by Ann Lacy, 1994.

Examples of Student Work

An Arts Forever Wild Challenge

Product Quality Checklist
Print This Checklist
Standard/Criteria: Points Possible: Points Awarded:

The group completed the worksheet describing a chosen Adirondack habitat

Each student in the group sketched two colored, detailed, proportionate, plant or animal shapes from that habitat

Two proportionate, textured, and "cured" clay slabs were made and assembled into the plastic lined form.

The group completed a base inside the form.

The group assembled and attached all the clay slabs, adding additional slabs if needed. Base and body are smooth on the inside.

The group created, attached, and smoothed the inside of the border. The name of the biome and the names of the students in the group are carved into the bottom of the container.

The finished product accurately depicts important elements of a food chain in the selected Adirondack habitat

This Challenge has not yet received any recommendations.

This Challenge has not yet received any comments.